Orangutan Habitat

Orangutan Habitat

Orangutan Natural Habitat Most orangutans in the wild live in rainforests where they enjoy the mild temperatures and plenty of food. They also have lots of trees in the forests for them to live in and to swing from. They can range from living about 10 feet from the ground or more than 150 feet up in the trees. This will depend on their lifestyle and how plentiful food is out there. Due to the destruction of their habitat some of them are forced to move into higher or lower elevations in an attempt to find enough food to survive on. They also may have to move into swamp lands or other territories as their natural habitat it taken over by logging or burned down. The destruction of this area for human needs is upsetting and it continues to take place at a very rapid rate. This is a huge problem as male orangutans can be extremely territorial. It is hard on them as a species when their areas start to overlap too much. They will be stressed out and it is going to be more difficult for them to get enough food. Most of the time they are found in close proximity to water. While they rarely swim, they do drink water due to the fact that they don’t eat as many plants as other great apes. The majority of their diet is sweet fruits so they need to drink water separately. They are great at improvising though. For example they will take large leaves, collect rain on them, and drink water that way when they need to. These animals don’t need very much water though so they can go for several days without it. They are migrational in the way they follow patterns to consume various types of fruit. Since many of them only grow at particular times of the year they will go back to that same habitat later on to consume it again. The problem though is that often those locations have been destroyed since they were last there. Protecting the natural habitat of the orangutan is very important. In fact, it is one of the main conservation efforts in place. These animals need to have their homes protected so that they can increase in numbers. If they don’t get enough of a range to relax and enough food they will be less likely to engage in mating. Since they already mate at a very slow rate this is a problem that continues to threaten their survival. In captivity, many efforts are made to ensure the orangutans have what they need to be happy. The large trees aren’t usually part of it but they do have plenty of toys then can climb and swing on. This includes ropes that they use for playing and for exercising. One of the main differences is that in captivity...

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Orangutan Reproduction

Orangutan Reproduction

Orangutan Breeding and Reproduction Orangutan males are ready to mate when they are approximately 15 years of age. For girls it is about 12 years of age. For these apes, they live along instead of in groups. When it is time for mating though the males and females find each other through a variety of calls as well as the scents that their bodies offer from various glands. The males also make what are called long calls followed by bellows. They can be heard for a very long distance. They are often used to call in females that are mature and ready for mating. These calls can go on for hours and hours when a mature male is determined to find a female that he can mate with. He will even pass up eating in order to continue his calls. As a male gets older he will grow larger flaps on his cheeks. These flaps are a physical attraction for the females. This is one of the reasons why it is the older male orangutans that generally get to engage in mating with the mature females. Generally these older males are also strong enough to fight off the younger ones that do want to challenge their territory. Males can be extremely aggressive when it comes to mating. They will force females to mate if they won’t do so willingly. If the female is strong enough she may be able to get away from the male. However, usually she won’t be strong enough and has to endure the process whether she is interested or not. If the mating is consensual then the pair may spend several days together interacting and mating before they go their separate ways again. After mating takes place, it takes from 8 ½ to 9 months for the baby to be born. There is almost always one baby born. There are few known cases of twins being born in captivity so it is assumed that this is not common in the wild. A newborn is about 3 1/2 pounds. The females take very good care of their offspring. It is common for the young to stay with their mothers for about the first 7 years of life. Most of the information we have about social behavior of orangutans in the wild is based on these types of interactions. For the first couple of years of life the babies ride on the backs of their mothers. Once they are old enough to consume fruits they will follow her through the forest. The childhood of the orangutan is the longest of all apes. It is also one of the longest of all animals out there. As a child becomes old enough to leave the mother, he or she will start to feed further and further away. Then one day the two will simply part ways and then she...

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